Equipment for Large-Scale Mammalian Cell Culture

Part of the Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology book series (ABE, volume 139)

Abstract

This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed.

Graphical Abstract

Keywords

Bioreactor Cell culture Cell retention Disposable Monoclonal antibody Perfusion Preculture Scale-up Seed train Single use 

Abbreviations

CHO

Chinese Hamster Ovary

BHK

Baby Hamster Kidney

cGMP

Current Good Manufacturing Practices

DO

Dissolved Oxygen

WFI

Water for Injection

HVAC

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning

QC

Quality Control

RTD

Resistance Temperature Detector

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MassBiologics of the University of Massachussets Medical SchoolMattapanUSA

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