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History Repeating? A Comparison of the Launch and Uses of Fixed and Mobile Phones

  • Amparo Lasen
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Part of the Computer Supported Cooperative Work book series (CSCW)

Keywords

Mobile Phone Public Place Short Messaging Service Mobile Telephone Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Hamill and Lasen 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amparo Lasen

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