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Perceived (Academic) Control and Scholastic Attainment in Higher Education

  • Raymond P. Perry
  • Nathan C. Hall
  • Joelle C. Ruthig

Keywords

Perceived control paradox of failure attribution theory causal attributions academic motivation and achievement academic engagement achievement striving 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond P. Perry
    • 1
  • Nathan C. Hall
    • 2
  • Joelle C. Ruthig
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Manitoba CanadaCanada
  2. 2.University of California at IrvineIrvineU S A
  3. 3.University of North DakotaGrand ForksUnited States

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