Trends in Antarctic Terrestrial and Limnetic Ecosystems: Antarctica as a Global Indicator

  • A. H. L. Huiskes
  • P. Convey
  • D. M. Bergstrom

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. H. L. Huiskes
    • 1
  • P. Convey
    • 2
  • D. M. Bergstrom
    • 3
  1. 1.Unit for Polar EcologyNetherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)POB 140, 4400 AC YersekeThe Netherlands
  2. 2.British Antarctic SurveyNatural Environment Research CouncilCambridge CB3 0ETUnited Kingdom
  3. 3.Department of Environment and HeritageAustralian Government Antarctic Division203 Channel HighwayAustralia

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