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Space Towers

  • Alexander A. Bolonkin
Part of the Water Science and Technology Library book series (WSTL, volume 54)

Abstract

The author proposes two new revolutionary macro-engineering projects: inflatable pneumatic high altitude towers (height up to 100 km) and kinetic cable space towers (height up 160,000 km). The second method allows building of space elevator without rocket flights to space. Related to the first macro-project, the author provides theory and computations for building inflatable space towers. These macro-projects are not expensive and do not require rockets. They require thin strong films composed of artificial fibers and fabricated by current industry. They can be built using present technology. Towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require outdoor work at high altitudes; all construction can be done at the Earth’s surface. The transport system for a tower consists of a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the Earth’s surface. The tower is separated into sections and has special protection mechanisms in case of damage. Related to the second macro-project, the author discusses a revolutionary new method to access outer space. A cable stands up vertically and pulls up its payload into space with a maximum force determined by its strength. From the ground the cable is allowed to rise up to the required altitude. After this, one can climb to any altitude using this cable or deliver a payload at altitude. The author shows how this is possible without infringing the law of gravity. The Section 2 contains the theory and computations for four macro-projects (towers that are 4, 75, 225 and 160,000 km in height, respectively). The first three macro-projects use the conventional artificial fiber produced by current industry, while the fourth project requires nanotubes currently made in scientific laboratories. The chapter also shows in a fifth macro-project how this idea can be used to launch a load at high altitude

Key Words

space tower pneumatic tower cable tower 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander A. Bolonkin
    • 1
  1. 1.C&R CoBrooklynUSA

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