Strategic Options in Using Sterile Insects for Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management

  • J. Hendrichs
  • M. J. B. Vreysen
  • W. R. Enkerlin
  • J. P. Cayol

Summary

The four strategic options, “suppression”, “eradication”, “containment” and “prevention”, in which the sterile insect technique (SIT) can be deployed as part of area-wide integrated pest management (AWIPM) interventions, are defined and described in relation to the contexts in which they are applied against exotic or naturally occurring major insect pests. Advantages and disadvantages of these strategic options are analysed, and examples of successful programmes provided. Considerations of pest status, biology and distribution affecting decision-making in relation to strategy selection are reviewed and discussed in terms of feasibility assessment, and programme planning and implementation. Unrealistic expectations are often associated with applying the SIT, resulting in high political costs to change a strategy during implementation. The choice of strategy needs to be assessed carefully, and considerable baseline data obtained to prepare for the selected strategy, before embarking on an AW-IPM programme with an SIT component.

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Copyright information

© IAEA. Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Hendrichs
    • 1
  • M. J. B. Vreysen
    • 1
  • W. R. Enkerlin
    • 1
  • J. P. Cayol
    • 1
  1. 1.Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and AgricultureInternational Atomic Energy AgencyViennaAustria

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