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Complementary Epistemologies of Science Teaching

Towards an Integral Perspective
  • John William Willison
  • Peter Charles Taylor
Part of the Science & Technology Education Library book series (CTISE, volume 30)

Keywords

Science Education Science Teacher Conceptual Change Social Constructivism Knowledge Claim 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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10.1 References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • John William Willison
    • 1
  • Peter Charles Taylor
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Curtin University of TechnologyAustralia

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