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Emotional Development, Science and Co-Education

  • Brian Matthews
Part of the Science & Technology Education Library book series (CTISE, volume 29)

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References

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Matthews
    • 1
  1. 1.Goldsmiths College, University of LondonUK

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