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The Generation of Bidding Rules for Auction-Based Robot Coordination

  • Craig Tovey
  • Michail G. Lagoudakis
  • Sonal Jain
  • Sven Koenig

Abstract

Robotics researchers have used auction-based coordination systems for robot teams because of their robustness and efficiency. However, there is no research into systematic methods for deriving appropriate bidding rules for given team objectives. In this paper, we propose the first such method and demonstrate it by deriving bidding rules for three possible team objectives of a multi-robot exploration task. We demonstrate experimentally that the resulting bidding rules indeed exhibit good performance for their respective team objectives and compare favorably to the optimal performance. Our research thus allows the designers of auction-based coordination systems to focus on developing appropriate team objectives, for which good bidding rules can then be derived automatically.

Keywords

Auctions Bidding Rules Multi-Robot Coordination Exploration 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Craig Tovey
    • 1
  • Michail G. Lagoudakis
    • 1
  • Sonal Jain
    • 2
  • Sven Koenig
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Industrial and Systems EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyUSA
  2. 2.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of Southern California

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