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Funology pp 31-42 | Cite as

The Thing and I: Understanding the Relationship Between User and Product

  • Marc Hassenzahl
Part of the Human-Computer Interaction Series book series (HCIS, volume 3)

Keywords

Product Character Emotional Reaction User Experience Usage Mode Usage Situation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Hassenzahl

There are no affiliations available

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