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Doctoral Student Attrition and Persistence: A Meta-Synthesis of Research

  • Carolyn Richert Bair
  • Jennifer Grant Haworth
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 19)

Keywords

Doctoral Dissertation Completion Rate Grade Point Average Doctoral Student Doctoral Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolyn Richert Bair
    • 1
  • Jennifer Grant Haworth
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Northern IowaUSA
  2. 2.Loyola University of ChicagoUSA

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