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Models of Development in Statistical Reasoning

  • Graham A. Jones
  • Cynthia W. Langrall
  • Edward S. Mooney
  • Carol A. Thornton

Keywords

Cognitive Model Middle School Student Mathematical Thinking Statistical Reasoning Statistical Concept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham A. Jones
    • 1
  • Cynthia W. Langrall
    • 2
  • Edward S. Mooney
    • 2
  • Carol A. Thornton
    • 2
  1. 1.Griffith UniversityAustralia
  2. 2.Illinois State UniversityUSA

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