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Self and Identity

  • Timothy J. Owens
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Social Movement Social Identity Personal Identity Identity Theory Postpartum Depression 
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Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy J. Owens
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyPurdue UniversityWest Lafayette

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