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Comparative and Historical Patterns of Education

  • Randall Collins
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Historical Pattern Educational Organization Educational Expansion Elite School Professional License 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randall Collins
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia

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