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How to (Really) Share a Secret

  • Gustavus J. Simmons
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 403)

Abstract

In information based systems, the integrity of the information (from unauthorized scrutiny or disclosure, manipulation or alteration, forgery, false dating, etc.) is commonly provided for by requiring operation(s) on the information that one or more of the participants, who know some private piece(s) of information not known to all of the other participants, can carry out but which (probably) can’t be carried out by anyone who doesn’t know the private information. Encryption/decryption in a single key cryptoalgorithm is a paradigm of such an operation, with the key being the private (secret) piece of information. Although it is implicit, it is almost never stated explicitly that in a single-key cryptographic communications link, the transmitter and the receiver must unconditionally trust each other since either can do anything that the other can.

Keywords

Private Information Algebraic Variety Secret Data Shared Secret Scheme Secret Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gustavus J. Simmons
    • 1
  1. 1.Sandia National LaboratoriesAlbuquerque

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