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Investors: The Best Approach

Abstract

The comparative analysis in Chapter 8 indicates that a privately financed and managed initiative would be the most efficient and productive approach to returning to the Moon in the foreseeable future. Any large-scale private initiative focused on a Return to the Moon will have as its ultimate aim a return on investment from production and sale of lunar resources and terrestrial power. In addition to helium-3 for fusion power, sales of by-products, such as hydrogen, water, and oxygen to customers in space will add to bottom-line income as well as to investor return. The same can be said of ancillary services based on the existence of a lunar settlement and the new space transportation systems required to establish and service that settlement.

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Chief Executive Officer Isotope Production Fusion Technology Fusion Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Praxis Publishing Ltd. 2006

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