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A Hallmark of Humankind: The Gluteus Maximus Muscle

Its Form, Action, and Function
  • Françoise K. Jouffroy
  • Monique F. Médina
Conference paper
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Keywords

Inverted Pendulum Gluteus Maximus Gluteus Medius Bipedal Walking Electromyographic Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Françoise K. Jouffroy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Monique F. Médina
    • 1
  1. 1.Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, USM302CNRSParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of Anatomical Sciences, Health Sciences CenterStony Brook UniversityUSA

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