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Challenges in Open-Ended Problem Solving with Genetic Programming

  • Jason M. Daida
Part of the Genetic Programming book series (GPEM, volume 9)

Abstract

This chapter describes how genetic programming might be integrated as a tool into the human context of discovery. To accomplish this, a comparison is made between GP and a well-regarded strategy in open-ended problem solving. The comparison indicates which tasks and skills are likely to be complemented by GP. Furthermore, the comparison also indicates directions in research that may need to be taken for GP to be further leveraged as a tool that assists discovery.

Key words

genetic programming (GP) open-ended problem solving McMaster Problem Solving 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jason M. Daida
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for the Study of Complex Systems and Space Physics Research LaboratoryThe University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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