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Assessing chemical communication in elephants

  • Bruce A. Schulte
  • Kathryn Bagley
  • Maureen Correll
  • Amy Gray
  • Sarah M. Heineman
  • Helen Loizi
  • Michelle Malament
  • Nancy L. Scott
  • Barbara E. Slade
  • Lauren Stanley
  • Thomas E. Goodwin
  • L. E. L. Rasmussen
Conference paper

Keywords

Chemical Signal Bark Beetle Asian Elephant African Elephant Vomeronasal Organ 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce A. Schulte
    • 2
  • Kathryn Bagley
    • 2
  • Maureen Correll
    • 3
  • Amy Gray
    • 2
  • Sarah M. Heineman
    • 4
  • Helen Loizi
    • 2
  • Michelle Malament
    • 5
  • Nancy L. Scott
    • 6
  • Barbara E. Slade
    • 6
  • Lauren Stanley
    • 2
  • Thomas E. Goodwin
    • 4
  • L. E. L. Rasmussen
    • 1
  1. 1.Oregon Health and Sciences UniversityBeaverton
  2. 2.Georgia Southern UniversityStatesboro
  3. 3.College of William and MaryWilliamsburg
  4. 4.Hendrix CollegeConway
  5. 5.Miami UniversityOxford
  6. 6.Portland State UniversityPortland

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