Pilot Study on the Impact of Potato Chips Consumption on Biomarkers of Acrylamide Exposure

  • Hubert W. Vesper
  • Hermes Licea-Perez
  • Tunde Meyers
  • Maria Ospina
  • Gary L. Myers
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 561)

Abstract

Food is assumed to be one major source of acrylamide exposure in the general population. Acrylamide exposure is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide as biomarkers. Little is known about the impact of acrylamide in food on biomarkers of acrylamide exposure. Therefore, CDC is conducting a feeding study to investigate the effect of consumption of endogenous acrylamide in food on biomarkers of acrylamide exposure. As part of this study, we performed a pilot study to obtain further information on the magnitude of the changes in biomarker levels after consumption of high amounts of potato chips (21 ounces) over a short period of time (1 week) in non-smokers. After 1 week, biomarkers levels increased up to 46% for acrylamide adducts and 79% for glycidamide adducts. The results indicate that changes in biomarker levels due to consumption of potato chips can be detected. However, because of the design of this pilot study, the observed magnitude of change cannot be generalized and needs to be confirmed in the main study.

Key words

acrylamide glycidamide hemoglobin adducts LC-MS/MS potato chips pilot study 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hubert W. Vesper
    • 1
  • Hermes Licea-Perez
    • 1
  • Tunde Meyers
    • 1
  • Maria Ospina
    • 1
  • Gary L. Myers
    • 1
  1. 1.Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNational Center for Environmental HealthAtlanta

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