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The Case for the OCD Spectrum

  • Eric Hollander
  • Jennifer P. Friedberg
  • Stacey Wasserman
  • Chin-Chin Yeh
  • Rupa Iyengar
Part of the Series in Anxiety and Related Disorders book series (SARD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder with an often chronic course that is estimated to have a lifetime prevalence rate of 1.9–3% in the United States (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). However, a substantially greater percentage of the population has symptoms that overlap with OCD and may be included within the so-called obsessive-compulsive spectrumdisorders (OCSDs).OCD and OCSDs are characterized by obsessions, defined as recurrent and intrusive thoughts, impulses, or images that cause marked distress, and/or compulsions, which are repetitive behaviors performed in response to an obsession (American Psychiatric Association, 2000; Hollander & Wong, 1995a). As is shown in Figure 5.1, OCSDs may be subdivided into three basic clusters: (1) neurological disorders with repetitive behaviors, (2) impulse control disorders, and (3) body image, body sensation, and body weight concern disorders.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Bulimia Nervosa Pathological Gambling Binge Eating Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Hollander
    • 1
  • Jennifer P. Friedberg
    • 2
  • Stacey Wasserman
    • 1
  • Chin-Chin Yeh
    • 1
  • Rupa Iyengar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Ferkauf Graduate Psychology/Albert Einstein College of MedicineYeshiva UniversityBronxUSA

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