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Using Genetic Programming in Industrial Statistical Model Building

  • Flor Castillo
  • Arthur Kordon
  • Jeff Sweeney
  • Wayne Zirk
Part of the Genetic Programming book series (GPEM, volume 8)

Abstract

The chapter summarizes the practical experience of integrating genetic programming and statistical modeling at The Dow Chemical Company. A unique methodology for using Genetic Programming in statistical modeling of designed and undesigned data is described and illustrated with successful industrial applications. As a result of the synergistic efforts, the building technique has been improved and the model development cost and time can be significantly reduced. In case of designed data Genetic Programming reduced costs by suggesting transformations as an alternative to doing additional experimentation. In case of undesigned data Genetic Programming was instrumental in reducing the model building costs by providing alternative models for consideration.

Keywords

Genetic programming statistical model building symbolic regression undesigned data 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Flor Castillo
    • 1
  • Arthur Kordon
    • 1
  • Jeff Sweeney
    • 2
  • Wayne Zirk
    • 3
  1. 1.The Dow Chemical CompanyFreeport
  2. 2.The Dow Chemical CompanyMidland
  3. 3.The Dow Chemical CompanySouth Charleston

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