Use of Multiple Speech Recognition Units in an In-car Assistance System

  • Alessio Brutti
  • Paolo Coletti
  • Luca Cristoforetti
  • Petra Geutner
  • Alessandro Giacomini
  • Mirko Maistrello
  • Marco Matassoni
  • Maurizio Omologo
  • Frank Steffens
  • Piergiorgio Svaizer

Abstract

This chapter presents an advanced dialogue system based on in-car hands-free voice interaction, conceived for obtaining driving assistance and for accessing tourist information while driving. Part of the related activities aimed at developing this “Virtual Intelligent Codriver” are being conducted under the European VICO project. The architecture of the dialogue system is here presented, with a description of its main modules: Front-end Speech Processing, Recognition Engine, Natural Language Understanding, Dialogue Manager and Car Wide Web. The use of a set of HMM recognizers, running in parallel, is being investigated within this project in order to ensure low complexity, modularity, fast response, and to allow a real-time reconfiguration of the language models and grammars according to the dialogue context. A corpus of spontaneous speech interactions was collected at ITC-irst using the Wizard-of-Oz method in a real driving situation. Multiple recognition units specialized on geographical subdomains and simpler language models were experimented using the resulting corpus. This investigation shows that, in presence of large lists of names (e.g. cities, streets, hotels), the choice of the output with maximum likelihood among the active units, although a simple approach, provides better results than the use of a single comprehensive language model.

Keywords

Automatic speech recognition in-car dialogue system driving assistance language models 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    Proceedings of the Hands-Free Speech Communication Workshop (HSC), Kyoto (Japan), 2001.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    M. Omologo, P. Svaizer, M. Matassoni, “Environmental conditions and acoustic transduction in hands-free speech recognition”, Speech Communication, vol. 25, pp. 75–95, 1998.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    J.H.L. Hansen, X. Zhang, M. Akbacak, U. Yapanel, B. Pellom, W. Ward, “CU-Move: Advances in In-Vehicle Speech Systems for Route Navigation”, Proc. of the Workshop on DSP in Mobile and Vehicular Systems, Nagoya, Japan, 2003.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    N. Kawaguchi, S. Matsubara, I. Kishida, Y. Irie, Y. Yamaguchi, K. Takeda, F. Itakura, “Construction and Analysis of the Multi-layered In-car Spoken Dialogue Corpus”, Proc. of the Workshop on DSP in Mobile and Vehicular Systems, Nagoya, Japan, 2003.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    P. Geutner, F. Steffens, D. Manstetten, Design of the VICO spoken dialogue system: evaluation of user expectations by Wizard-of-Oz experiments, Proc. of LREC, Las Palmas (Spain), 2002.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    P. Coletti, L. Cristoforetti, M. Matassoni, M. Omologo, P. Svaizer, P. Geutner, F. Steffens, “A speech driven in-car assistance system”, Proc. of the IEEE Intelligent Vehicles [IV 2003], Columbus, OH, 2003.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    H. Hüning, A. Berton, U. Haiber, F. Class, “Speech Recognition Methods and their Potential for Dialogue Systems in Mobile Environments”, ISCA Workshop, Kloster Irsee (Germany), June 2002.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    L. Cristoforetti, M. Matassoni, M. Omologo, P. Svaizer, “Use of parallel recognizers for robust in-car speech interaction”, IEEE ICASSP-03: Inter. Conf. Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Hong Kong, 2003.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    M. Matassoni, G.A. Mian, M. Omologo, A. Santarelli, P. Svaizer, “Some experiments on the use of one-channel noise reduction techniques with the Italian SpeechDat Car database”, Proc. of ASRU, Madonna di Campiglio (Italy), 2001.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    M. Matassoni, M. Omologo, A. Santarelli, P. Svaizer, “On the joint use of noise reduction and MLLR adaptation for in-car hands-free speech recognition”, IEEE ICASSP-02: Inter. Conf. Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Orlando (FL), 2002.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    A. Moreno, B. Lindberg, C. Draxler, G. Richard, K. Choukri, S. Euler, J. Allen, “A Large Speech Database for Automotive Environments”, Proc. of LREC, Athens (Greece), 2000.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    R. Solsona, E. Fosler-Lussier, H.J. Kuo, A. Potamianos, I. Zitouni, “Adaptive Language Models for Spoken Dialogue Systems”, Proc. of ICASSP, Orlando (FL), 2002.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    P. Coletti, L. Cristoforetti, M. Matassoni, M. Omologo, P. Svaizer, “Developing a speech interaction system for the car”, Proc. of the 8th International Conference on Human Aspects of Advanced Manufacturing: Agility & Hybrid Automation [HAAMAHA 03], Rome, Italy, 2003.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alessio Brutti
    • 1
  • Paolo Coletti
    • 1
  • Luca Cristoforetti
    • 1
  • Petra Geutner
    • 2
  • Alessandro Giacomini
    • 1
  • Mirko Maistrello
    • 1
  • Marco Matassoni
    • 1
  • Maurizio Omologo
    • 1
  • Frank Steffens
    • 2
  • Piergiorgio Svaizer
    • 1
  1. 1.ITC-irst (Centro per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica)Povo - TrentItaly
  2. 2.Corporate Research and DevelopmentRobert Bosch GmbHStuttgartGermany

Personalised recommendations