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Spinosad Toxicity to Pollinators and Associated Risk

  • Monte A. Mayes
  • Gary D. Thompson
  • Brian Husband
  • Mark M. Miles
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 179)

Keywords

Staminate Flower Adult Honeybee Brood Development European Plant Protection Organization Spinosad Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monte A. Mayes
    • 1
  • Gary D. Thompson
    • 2
  • Brian Husband
    • 3
  • Mark M. Miles
    • 4
  1. 1.Field Exposure and Effects LaboratoryDow AgroSciencesIndianapolisUSA
  2. 2.Global Insect ManagementDow AgroSciencesIndianapolisUSA
  3. 3.Private Bag 2017Dow AgroSciencesNew PlymouthNew Zealand
  4. 4.Field Research and DevelopmentDow AgroSciencesAbington, OxfordshireUK

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