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Tree-Ring Reconstructions of Fire and Climate History in the Sierra Nevada and Southwestern United States

  • Thomas W. Swetnam
  • Christopher H. Baisan
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 160)

Keywords

Tree Ring Southern Oscillation Palmer Drought Severity Index Fire History Medieval Warm Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas W. Swetnam
  • Christopher H. Baisan

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