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Higher Education, Sustainability, and the Role of Systemic Learning

  • Stephen Sterling

Keywords

High Education Deep Learning Transformative Learning Learning Level Sustainability Transition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Sterling

There are no affiliations available

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