Understanding and Preventing Crime and Violence

Findings from the Seattle Social Development Project
  • J. David Hawkins
  • Brian H. Smith
  • Karl G. Hill
  • Rick Kosterman
  • Richard F. Catalano
  • Robert D. Abbott

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. David Hawkins
  • Brian H. Smith
  • Karl G. Hill
  • Rick Kosterman
  • Richard F. Catalano
  • Robert D. Abbott

There are no affiliations available

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