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Neuroprotective Effects of Inhibitors of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV In Vitro and In Vivo

  • Yong-Qian Wu
  • David C. Limburg
  • Douglas E. Wilkinson
  • Paul Jackson
  • Joseph P. Steiner
  • Gregory S. Hamilton
  • Sergei A. Belyako
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 524)

Conclusion

For the first time, we demonstrated both neuroprotective and neuroregeneratrive effects of common DPP-IV inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. DPP IV inhibitors protect motor neurons from excitotoxic cell death. They are systemically active and protect striatal innervation of dopaminergic neurons, when administered concurrently with MPTP. Furthermore, DPP-IV inhibitors promote recovery of striatal innervation density when given in a therapeutic manner following MPTP treatment. These data suggest that DPP IV inhibitors may provide protective effects on neurons and promote their use as therapies for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

Keywords

Boronic Acid Cyano Group Excitotoxic Cell Death Glycine Derivative Immunophilin Ligand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yong-Qian Wu
    • 1
  • David C. Limburg
    • 1
  • Douglas E. Wilkinson
    • 1
  • Paul Jackson
    • 1
  • Joseph P. Steiner
    • 1
  • Gregory S. Hamilton
    • 1
  • Sergei A. Belyako
    • 1
  1. 1.Guilford Pharmaceuticals, Inc.BaltimoreUSA

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