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Aspects of the Interactions between Wild Lactuca Spp. and Related Genera and Lettuce Downy Mildew (Bremia Lactucae)

  • A. Lebeda
  • D. A. C. Pink
  • D. Astley

Keywords

Downy Mildew Field Resistance British Mycological Society Lettuce Cultivar Nonhost Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lebeda
    • 1
  • D. A. C. Pink
    • 2
  • D. Astley
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Botany, Faculty of SciencePalacký UniversityOlomouc-HoliceCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Plant Geneticsand BiotechnologyHorticulture Research InternationalWellesbourneUK

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