Mechanisms of Resistance in Conifers and Bark beetle Attack Strategies

  • François Lieutier

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References

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • François Lieutier
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes CulturesUniversité d’OrléansOrléans CedexFrance
  2. 2.Unité de Zoologie ForestièreINRAOlivet CedexFrance

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