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Why Education Matters

Race, ethnicity, poverty and American school-equity research
  • Douglas Cochrane

Keywords

Minority Student Catholic School Multiple Intelligence Scholastic Aptitude Test Education Matter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas Cochrane
    • 1
  1. 1.American Institutes for Research/Education Statistics Services InstituteWashington, D.C.

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