Effects of Whole Wheat Flour and Fermentable Carbohydrates on Intestinal Absorption of Trace Elements in Rats

  • C. Coudray
  • H. W. Lopez
  • M. A. Levrat-Verny
  • J. Bellanger
  • C. Rémésy
  • Y. Rayssiguier

Conclusion

If these results can not be directly extrapolated to human nutrition, they show that whole flour or unrefined cereal products ingestion can contribute to improved mineral balance. The cecal fermantation of soluble carbohydrates present in these products may be responsible for such mineral absorption enhancement and adequate mineral balance. Several epidemiological and clinical studies have recently shown growing interest in increasing the consumption of phytic acid-rich products in preventive nutrition. Negative effects of such products on mineral bioavailability may be neutralized when these products are taken together with the other components of the meal. It is thus possible to promote the consumption of whole grains rather than of purified cereal products, to keep functionally active constituents of grains and to optimize the mineral status in humans. Human studies are still needed to confirm these rat results.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Coudray
    • 1
  • H. W. Lopez
    • 1
  • M. A. Levrat-Verny
    • 1
  • J. Bellanger
    • 1
  • C. Rémésy
    • 1
  • Y. Rayssiguier
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine’ Auvergne Laboratoire Maladies Métaboliques et MicronutrimentsINRA Clermont-Ferrand/TheixSaint Genès ChampanelleFrance

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