Advertisement

ECSCW ’99 pp 219-238 | Cite as

The Network Communities of SeniorNet

  • Elizabeth D. Mynatt
  • Annette Adler
  • Mizuko Ito
  • Charlotte Linde
  • Vicki L. O’Day

Abstract

With the explosion of participation on the lnternet, there is increasing interest and speculation in extending its uses to support diverse online communities, and particular interest in using the lnternet to combat loneliness and isolation amongst senior citizens. For the past year, we have been investigating SeniorNet (SN), a 12 year old organization that attempts to bring seniors together via computer networking technologies. We found a rich tapestry of human relationships supported by various technical and social underpinnings. ln this paper, we delve into the richness of an active community and describe the intertwining technical and social factors that make it valuable and useful for its members. An underlying question in these discussions is “lf network communities have to be principally created and maintained by their members (as we posit), then how do designers help without getting in the way?”

Keywords

Online Community Senior Citizen Discussion Roundtable Online Space Virtual Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Butler, Judith. 1990. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Hagel, J. and Armstrong, A. G. (1997). Net Gain: Expanding Markets Through Virtual Communities. Harvard Business School Press. Cambridge.Google Scholar
  3. Hooks, Bell. 1997. “Sisterhood: Political Solidarity between Women.” In Diana Tietjens Meyers Ed., Feminist Social Thought: A Reader. New York: Routledge. pp. 484–500.Google Scholar
  4. Kiesler, S. (1997) Culture of the Internet. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  5. Kollock, P. (1996) Design Principles for Online Communities” in Harvard Conference on the Internet and Society also published in PC Update, 15(5): 58–60, June 1998.Google Scholar
  6. Kraut, R. Patterson, M. Lundmard, V. Kiesler. S., Mukophadhyay, T & Scherlis, W. (1998). “Internet paradox: A social technology that reduces social involvement and psychological well-being?” American Psychologist, Vol. 53, No. 9, 10171031.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Kraut, R. E., Scherlis, W., Patterson, M., Kiesler, S. & Mukhopadhyay, T. (1998). “Implications of the Internet Paradox research,” in Communications of the ACM, 41(12), 21–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mynatt, E.D., Adler, A., Ito, M., and O’Day, V.L. (1998). Network Communities: Something Old, Something, New, Something Borrowed... In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Interaction and Collaboration in MUDS, Vol. 7, Number 1/2, 123–156.Google Scholar
  9. Schuler, D. and Stone, T. (1996) New Community Networks: Wired for Change, Addison Wesley.Google Scholar
  10. Sproull, L, and Kiesler, S. (1995). Connections: New Ways of Working in Networked Organizations. MIT Press.Google Scholar
  11. Rheingold, H. (1993) The Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier: Addison Wesley Publishing Company.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth D. Mynatt
    • 1
  • Annette Adler
    • 2
  • Mizuko Ito
    • 3
  • Charlotte Linde
    • 3
  • Vicki L. O’Day
    • 4
  1. 1.Georgia Institute of TechnologyUSA
  2. 2.Xerox Palo Alto Research CenterUSA
  3. 3.Institute for Research on LearningUSA
  4. 4.University of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA

Personalised recommendations