A Novel Catalytic Process for Generating Hydrogen Gas from Aqueous Borohydride Solutions

  • Steven C. Amendola
  • Michael Binder
  • Michael T. Kelly
  • Phillip J. Petillo
  • Stefanie L. Sharp-Goldman

Abstract

A safe, simple, lightweight, and compact process generates high-purity hydrogen gas on demand from base-stabilized, aqueous solutions of sodium borohydride, NaBH4, by using a ruthenium catalyst. NaBH4 solutions can generate the equivalent of >2,500 Wh/L and >7% H2 by weight can be recovered. These inherently stable solutions do not generate significant amounts of H2 gas under ambient conditions. However, when in contact with heterogeneous Ru catalyst, NaBH4 solutions rapidly hydrolyze to form H2 gas and sodium borate, a water-soluble, inert salt. H2 generation only occurs when NaBH4 solutions are in contact with Ru catalyst. When Ru catalyst is removed from NaBH4 solution (or NaBH4 solution is separated from Ru catalyst), H2 generation stops. This H2 generator promises to be safer, have quicker response to H2 demand, have a greater H2 storage efficiency, and be more easily controllable than current H2 storage devices/generators. It can be easily incorporated into any system where H2 gas is required, such as powering internal combustion engines or fuel cells.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    H.I. Schlesinger, H.C. Brown, A.E. Finholt, J.R. Gilbreath, H.R. Hockstra and E.K. Hyde, “Sodium Borohydride, its Hydrolysis and its Use as a Reducing agent and in the Generation of Hydrogen”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 75, 215 (1953).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W.D. Davis, L.S. Mason, and G. Stegeman, “The Heats of Formation of Sodium Borohydride, Lithium Borohydride and Lithium Aluminum Hydride”, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 71, 2775 (1949).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    C.M. Kaufman and B. Sen, “Hydrogen Generation by Hydrolysis of Sodium Tetrahydroborate: Effects of Acids and Transition Metals and Their Salts”, Journal of the Chemical Society, Dalton Trans. 307 (1985).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    K.A. Holbrook and P.J. Twist, “Hydrolysis of the Borohydride Ion Catalysed by Metal-Boron Alloys”, Journal of the Chemical Society (A), 1971, 890.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Levy, J.B. Brown, and C.J. Lyons, “Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride”, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 52, 211 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    H.C. Brown and C.A. Brown, “New, Highly Active Metal Catalysts for the Hydrolysis of Borohydride”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 84, 1493 (1962).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven C. Amendola
    • 1
  • Michael Binder
    • 1
  • Michael T. Kelly
    • 1
  • Phillip J. Petillo
    • 1
  • Stefanie L. Sharp-Goldman
    • 1
  1. 1.MILLENNIUM CELL LLCEatontown

Personalised recommendations