Studies in Economic History

Description

Aims and Scope

This series from Springer provides a platform for works in economic history that truly integrate economics and history. Books on a wide range of related topics are welcomed and encouraged, including those in macro-economic history, financial history, labor history, industrial history, agricultural history, the history of institutions and organizations, spatial economic history, law and economic history, political economic history, historical demography, and environmental history.

Economic history studies have greatly developed over the past several decades through application of economics and econometrics. Particularly in recent years, a variety of new economic theories and sophisticated econometric techniques—including game theory, spatial economics, and generalized method of moment (GMM)—have been introduced for the great benefit of economic historians and the research community.

At the same time, a good economic history study should contribute more than just an application of economics and econometrics to past data. It raises novel research questions, proposes a new view of history, and/or provides rich documentation. This series is intended to integrate data analysis, close examination of archival works, and application of theoretical frameworks to offer new insights and even provide opportunities to rethink theories.

The purview of this new Springer series is truly global, encompassing all nations and areas of the world as well as all eras from ancient times to the present. The editorial board, who are internationally renowned leaders among economic historians, carefully evaluate and judge each manuscript, referring to reports from expert reviewers. The series publishes contributions by university professors and others well established in the academic community, as well as work deemed to be of equivalent merit.


Series Editor: Tetsuji Okazaki (The University of Tokyo, Japan)

Editorial Board Members:

Loren Brandt (University of Toronto, Canada)

Myung Soo Cha (Yeungnam University, Korea)

Nicholas Crafts (University of Warwick, UK)

Claude Diebolt (University of Strasbourg, France)

Barry Eichengreen (University of California at Berkeley, USA)

Stanley Engerman (University of Rochester, USA)

Price V. Fishback (University of Arizona, USA)

Avner Greif (Stanford University, USA)

Tirthanker Roy (London School of Economics and Political Science, UK)

Osamu Saito (Hitotsubashi University, Japan; The Japan Academy, Japan)

Jochen Streb (University of Mannheim, Germany)

Nikolaus Wolf (Humboldt University, Germany)


(in alphabetical order)