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Hitchcock and the Anxiety of Authorship

  • Authors
  • Leslie H. Abramson

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Introduction Self-Reflexivity in Hitchcock’s Cinema and Struggles of Authorship

  3. Compromising Positions: The Director

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 17-17
    2. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 19-38
    3. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 39-45
    4. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 47-56
    5. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 57-70
    6. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 71-82
    7. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 83-93
  4. Dramatic Artfulness: The Actor

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 95-95
    2. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 97-109
    3. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 111-119
    4. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 121-132
    5. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 133-144
    6. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 145-154
  5. Disturbing Sights: the Audience

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 155-155
    2. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 157-171
    3. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 173-184
    4. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 185-197
    5. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 199-209
    6. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 211-221
    7. Leslie H. Abramson
      Pages 223-231
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 233-282

About this book

Introduction

Hitchcock and the Anxiety of Authorship examines issues of cinema authorship engaged by and dynamized within the director's films. A unique study of self-reflexivity in Hitchcock's work from his earliest English silents to his final Hollywood features, this book considers how the director's releases constitute ever-shifting meditations on the conditions and struggles of creative agency in cinema. Abramson explores how, located in literal and emblematic sites of dramatic production, exhibition, and reception, and populated by figures of directors, actors, and audiences, Hitchcock's films exhibit a complicated, often disturbing vision of authorship - one that consistently problematizes rather than exemplifies the director's longstanding auteurist image. Viewing Hitchcock in a striking new light, Abramson analyzes these allegories of vexed agency in the context of his concepts of and commentary on the troubled association between cinema artistry and authorship, as well as the changing cultural, industrial, theoretical, and historical milieus in which his features were produced. Accordingly, the book illuminates how Hitchcock and his cinema register the constant dynamics that constitute film authorship.

Keywords

Alfred Hitchcock director cinema authorship cinema studies auteurism self-reflexivity British cinema Hollywood cinema The Lodger The Ring Murder! The Man Who Knew Too Much The 39 Steps Sabotage Spellbound Notorious Strangers on a Train Rear Window Vertigo Psycho cinema film Hollywood

Bibliographic information