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© 2005

Globalization, Women, and Health in the Twenty-First Century

  • Editors
  • IIona Kickbusch
  • Kari A. Hartwig
  • Justin M. List
Book
  • 538 Downloads

About this book

Introduction

We are still only beginning to understand the increasingly complex set of interdependencies among gender, health and globalization. This book brings together a diverse group of distinguished scholars and activists to explore the new risks and freedoms for men and women in a global society and their health determinants. They map the gendered impact of these processes and present a health landscape that takes us beyond nation states into trans-border flows of capital, people, goods and services. Each chapter begins with a global analysis of specific trends followed by two 'In Perspective' pieces by authors from contrasting disciplines and geographies.

Keywords

Europe gender Germany globalization human rights women

About the authors

ILONA KICKBUSH is Professor of Public Health at Yale University, USA.

KARI HARTWIG is Assistant Clinical Professor of Public Health at Yale University, USA.

JUSTIN LIST is currently a medical student at the University of Illinois-Chicago, USA.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

"This book teases apart the complex interactions that occur between the forces of globalization, gender issues, and selected specific health risks and outcomes. Usually we applaud when the gender gap closes because it signals less inequity in the world. But as the authors report in powerful case studies, as this happens for two of the largest and increasing causes of death in the world, HIV/AIDS and tobacco, the long-term impact will be devastatingly negative. Progress to reduce the burden of these and many other health outcomes require a sophisticated understanding of how best to harness globalization for good and how to redress centuries old gender biases in health policy development. The authors of this volume are to be commended for showing a possible way forward." - Derek Yach, Chair, Global Health Division, Yale School of Public Health