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Changing Patterns of Governance in the United Kingdom

Reinventing Whitehall?

  • David Marsh
  • David Richards
  • Martin J. Smith

Part of the Transforming Government book series

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 1-13
  3. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 14-42
  4. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 43-68
  5. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 69-100
  6. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 101-131
  7. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 132-154
  8. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 155-180
  9. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 181-208
  10. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 209-231
  11. David Marsh, David Richards, Martin J. Smith
    Pages 232-250
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 251-276

About this book

Introduction

This is the first comprehensive examination of the changing relations between ministers and civil servants since 1979. Based on an original account of power within central government and drawing on evidence compiled from over one hundred and fifty interviews, this book provides unprecedented insight into the world of Whitehall. As well as exploring the impact of eighteen years of Conservative government, the authors also examine the external pressures exerted by factors such as the European Union. They conclude by arguing that, despite recent claims about the end of the Whitehall model, many of the old features of the British system remain. Indeed, March, Richards and Smith demonstrate that departments continue to be key institutions in the policymaking process.

Keywords

Central government European Union (EU) executive Government Institution Policy policymaking

Authors and affiliations

  • David Marsh
    • 1
  • David Richards
    • 2
  • Martin J. Smith
    • 3
  1. 1.University of BirminghamUK
  2. 2.University of LiverpoolUK
  3. 3.University of SheffieldUK

Bibliographic information