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© 2014

Formation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in the Nineteenth Century

Rhetoric of Identification

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About this book

Introduction

This book explores the parameters of the African Methodist Episcopal Church's dual existence as evangelical Christians and as children of Ham, and how the denomination relied on both the rhetoric of evangelicalism and heathenism.

Keywords

Africa African Christianity church discourse god identity rhetoric

About the authors

A. Nevell Owens is an assistant professor in the Department of Visual Arts, Humanites & Theatre at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Bibliographic information

Reviews

"In a careful historical study, Owens exposes the 'double consciousness' that lives within the souls of African Methodist Episcopal church folk. By examining the struggles between 'North' and 'South;' evangelicalism and heathenism; civilization and superstition; America and Africa; doctrine and practice; and especially White Christianity and Black spirituality, Owens helps us gain insights into some of the ongoing questions concerning identity of African-descended Christians. The creative turn to African religious notions in the re-formulation of Christology makes this book a must-read for all who are concerned for renewal and re-vitalization in the spiritual lives of all people." - Emmanuel Y. Lartey, Professor of Pastoral Theology, Care and Counseling, Candler School of Theology, Emory University, USA

"Owens has written a deeply insightful, thoroughly researched and critical perspective on the 'double consciousness' of Black religiosity. This work is essential to students of religious history, members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and researchers of the complexities of social, historical, and contemporary faith traditions." - Dr. Teresa Fry Brown, Historiographer and Executive Director of Research and Scholarship, African Methodist Episcopal Church and Professor of Homiletics and Director of Black Church Studies, Candler School of Theology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA