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© 2013

The British Film Industry in the 1970s

Capital, Culture and Creativity

Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Sian Barber
    Pages 1-3
  3. Sian Barber
    Pages 4-14
  4. Sian Barber
    Pages 15-22
  5. Sian Barber
    Pages 23-37
  6. Sian Barber
    Pages 38-45
  7. Sian Barber
    Pages 46-58
  8. Sian Barber
    Pages 59-67
  9. Sian Barber
    Pages 68-76
  10. Sian Barber
    Pages 142-159
  11. Sian Barber
    Pages 177-183
  12. Back Matter
    Pages 184-221

About this book

Introduction

Is there more to 1970s British cinema than sex, horror and James Bond? This lively account argues that this is definitely the case and explores the cultural landscape of this much maligned decade to uncover hidden gems and to explode many of the well-established myths about 1970s British film and cinema.

Keywords

argue cinema creativity cultural history culture film history history of literature knowledge landscape organization performance present understanding William James

Authors and affiliations

  1. 1.Royal HollowayUniversity of LondonUK

About the authors

SIAN BARBER is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Royal Holloway, University of London, UK. She has published on British cinema, cinema going and censorship and her most recent publication is Censoring the 1970s: The BBFC and the Decade that Taste Forgot.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

'A substantial analysis of British film-making in the 1970s that will make a thoughtful contribution to the field of British cinema studies.'

- Andrew Spicer, University of the West of England, UK

'British Film in the 1970s is a great companion text to any module teaching British cinema of the period, but it also is a useful text to encourage those working on other times and places to ask questions about the framing of other periods and national cinemas.'

- Dr E. Anna Claydon, Viewfinder Online

'Barber's carefully researched volume will surely become the 'go to' book with regard to the industrial context of British film-making in this newly fashionable decade.'

- Stephen Glynn, Journal of British Cinema and Television (Jan 2014)