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© 2012

Policing in Africa

  • David J. Francis
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Policing in Transition Societies in Africa

  3. International Police Reform Capacity Building Partnerships: Lessons from Other Regions

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 141-141
    2. Suzette Grillot, Brooke Hammer
      Pages 143-164
    3. Fiona Macaulay
      Pages 165-190
  4. Back Matter
    Pages 191-219

About this book

Introduction

This wide-ranging collection offers fresh insights into a critical factor in development and politics on the African continent. It critically examines and illustrates the centrality of policing in transition societies in Africa, and outlines and assesses the emergence and impact of the diversity of state and non-state policing agencies.

Keywords

police politics transition violence

Editors and affiliations

  • David J. Francis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Peace Studies at the UniversityUK

About the editors

DAVID J. FRANCIS Professor of African Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Bradford, UK.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

'David J. Francis frames Policing in Africa within contemporary broad police sector reform in transition societies in Africa, with comparative contributions from the Balkans and Latin America. This is by far one of the most comprehensive studies of policing in Africa during what could be termed 'post-neoliberal' euphoria and its significant impacts on police organization and performance and police-community relations. Francis and his colleagues must be congratulated for putting Africa at the cutting edge of contemporary police studies. A must read for graduate and post-graduate students, researchers and scholars in the fields of sociology, politics, international relations, social movements, and legal pluralism. This book has food for thought, and is accessible and hugely relevant for policy makers and professionals dealing with police and security sector reforms, peace-keeping and conflict management professionals, and the general public.' M.A. Mohamed Salih, chair, Politics of Development, and deputy rector for research at the International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands