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Harold Monro

Poet of the New Age

  • Authors
  • Dominic Hibberd

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 1-5
  3. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 6-12
  4. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 13-20
  5. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 21-31
  6. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 32-56
  7. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 57-70
  8. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 71-90
  9. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 91-112
  10. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 113-127
  11. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 128-146
  12. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 147-176
  13. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 177-199
  14. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 200-215
  15. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 216-231
  16. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 232-245
  17. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 246-258
  18. Dominic Hibberd
    Pages 259-265
  19. Back Matter
    Pages 266-300

About this book

Introduction

Troubled by his complex sexuality, Monro was a tormented soul whose aim was to serve the cause of poetry. Hibberd's revealing and beautifully-written biography will help rescue Monro from the graveyard of literary history and claim for him the recognition he deserves. Poet and businessman, ascetic and alcoholic, socialist and reluctant soldier, twice-married yet homosexual, Harold Monro probably did more than anyone for poetry and poets in the period before and after the Great War, and yet his reward has been near oblivion. Aiming to encourage the poets of the future, he befriended, among many others, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound and the Imagists; Rupert Brooke and the Georgians; Marinetti the Futurist; Wilfred Owen and other war poets; and the noted women poets, Charlotte Mew and Amma Wickham.

Keywords

Bertrand Russell biography death freedom future George Eliot history history of literature knowledge liberty oblivion pilgrim poet poetry women

Bibliographic information