Hegel’s Systematic Contingency

  • Authors
  • John W. Burbidge

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-x
  2. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 1-15
  3. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 16-47
  4. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 48-55
  5. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 56-69
  6. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 70-80
  7. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 81-98
  8. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 99-105
  9. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 106-116
  10. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 117-130
  11. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 131-142
  12. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 143-152
  13. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 153-160
  14. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 161-174
  15. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 175-189
  16. John W. Burbidge
    Pages 190-193
  17. Back Matter
    Pages 194-219

About this book

Introduction

This book shows that, far from incorporating everything into an all-consuming necessity, Hegel's philosophy requires the novelty of unexpected contingencies to maintain its systematic pretensions. John Burbidge explores how Hegel applied this approach to chemistry, biology, psychology and history, and proposes implications on contemporary science.

Keywords

cognition Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Hegel history history of literature philosophy psychology science teleology

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230590366
  • Copyright Information Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2007
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, London
  • eBook Packages Palgrave Religion & Philosophy Collection
  • Print ISBN 978-1-349-35821-2
  • Online ISBN 978-0-230-59036-6
  • About this book