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Marriage in Seventeenth-Century English Political Thought

  • Authors
  • Belinda Roberts Peters

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-ix
  2. Introduction

    1. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 1-7
  3. Marriage Contract as Political Contract

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 9-9
    2. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 11-32
    3. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 33-54
    4. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 55-73
  4. Subjection in Oeconomy and Polity

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 75-75
    2. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 77-97
    3. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 98-122
    4. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 123-140
  5. Tyranny, Chastity and Liberty

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 141-141
    2. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 143-162
    3. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 163-183
    4. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 184-199
    5. Belinda Roberts Peters
      Pages 200-203
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 204-243

About this book

Introduction

This study traces the decline of marriage as a metaphor for political authority, subjection, and tyranny in Seventeenth-century political thought. An image that bound consent and contract with divine right absolutism, and irrevocably connected royal prerogatives with subjects' liberties, its disappearance in the middle decades of the century coincided with the full emergence of patriarchalist and social contract theories. If both these accepted the importance of 'fathers of families', neither would suggest that political government could be comparable to 'marriage'.

Keywords

Familie liberty seventeenth century

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230504776
  • Copyright Information Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2004
  • Publisher Name Palgrave Macmillan, London
  • eBook Packages Palgrave History Collection
  • Print ISBN 978-1-349-51461-8
  • Online ISBN 978-0-230-50477-6
  • Buy this book on publisher's site