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© 1999

White Noise

An A–Z of the Contradictions in Cyberculture

  • Authors
Book

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xi
  2. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 1-10
  3. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 11-18
  4. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 19-27
  5. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 28-34
  6. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 35-40
  7. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 41-47
  8. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 48-55
  9. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 56-61
  10. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 62-72
  11. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 73-77
  12. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 78-80
  13. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 81-84
  14. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 85-92
  15. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 93-97
  16. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 98-101
  17. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 102-105
  18. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 106-107
  19. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 108-113
  20. Andrew Calcutt
    Pages 114-121

About this book

Introduction

Transcending recent attempts to pigeonhole 'the information revolution', this book shows how the paradoxical aspects of new media and the Internet (is it masculine or feminine? Does it mean peace or war?) are the peculiarly intense expression of the contradictions underlying our whole society. Andrew Calcutt is an enthusiastic champion of the potential for new communications technology, and a trenchant critic of the culture of fear which prevents its realisation.

Keywords

communication culture democracy Internet media new media society technology

About the authors

ANDREW CALCUTT is a frequent contributor to LM Magazine and a commissioning editor at Web-Content Providers Cyberia Online. His work has also appeared in Arena, Futures, The Idler and The Modern Review. Previous publications include Arrested Development: Pop Culture and the Erosion of Adulthood, and Beat: the Iconography of Victimhood from the Beats to Princess Diana.

Bibliographic information

Reviews

"A sophisticated and readable survey of the myriad facets of cyber-culture." - Future Survey

"This is a marvelous book for use in both graduate and undergraduate courses in media and society, new technologies, or urban anthropology." - Communication Booknotes Quarterly