Advertisement

Transnational Crime and Black Spots

Rethinking Sovereignty and the Global Economy

  • Stuart S. Brown
  • Margaret G. Hermann
Book

Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xvi
  2. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
    Pages 1-12
  3. Theoretical Foundations

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 13-13
    2. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 15-31
    3. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 33-45
  4. Toward Discovering Black Spots Networks

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 47-47
    2. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 49-77
    3. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 79-109
    4. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 111-139
  5. Extensions and Implications

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 141-141
    2. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 143-164
    3. Stuart S. Brown, Margaret G. Hermann
      Pages 165-175
  6. Back Matter
    Pages 177-250

About this book

Introduction

“The strength of this book is that it does not look at a single case or even a few disparate examples of drug, weapon, and human trafficking but looks at many patterns—intra-regionally, cross-nationally, and internationally. It is an innovative addition to the literature on the nature of the safe havens—or ‘black spots’—currently being used for illicit activity. This book will make a clear impact on the scholarship of transnational crime and the geopolitics of the illicit global economy.”
Jeremy Morris, Aarhus University, Denmark

 Transnational criminal, insurgent, and terrorist organizations seek places that they can govern and operate from with minimum interference from law enforcement. This book examines 80 such safe havens which function outside effective state-based government control and are sustained by illicit economic activities. Brown and Hermann call these geographic locations ‘black spots’ because, like black holes in astronomy that defy the laws of Newtonian physics, they defy the world as defined by the Westphalian state system. The authors map flows of insecurity such as trafficking in drugs, weapons, and people, providing an unusually clear view of the hubs and networks that form as a result. As transnational crime is increasing on the internet, Brown and Hermann also explore if there are places in cyberspace which can be considered black spots. They conclude by elaborating the challenges that black spots pose for law enforcement and both national and international governance.


Keywords

Transnational Crime Cyberspace Illicit Economies Terrorism insurgent Organizations Political Sovereignty Economic Sovereignty Law Enforcement Federally Administered Tribal Areas Black Spots Mapping Global Insecurity Illicit Commerce The Hakkari-Van Provinces The Taliban The International Drug Trade Trafficked Goods Trafficked People Border Security Money Laundering Organized Crime

Authors and affiliations

  • Stuart S. Brown
    • 1
  • Margaret G. Hermann
    • 2
  1. 1.Moynihan Institute of Global AffairsMaxwell School, Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA
  2. 2.Moynihan Institute of Global AffairsMaxwell School, Syracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

Bibliographic information