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A Global Doll's House

Ibsen and Distant Visions

  • Julie Holledge
  • Jonathan Bollen
  • Frode Helland
  • Joanne Tompkins

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Performance and Technology book series (PSPT)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xiii
  2. Julie Holledge, Jonathan Bollen, Frode Helland, Joanne Tompkins
    Pages 1-23
  3. Cultural Transmission

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 25-28
    2. Julie Holledge, Jonathan Bollen, Frode Helland, Joanne Tompkins
      Pages 29-70
    3. Julie Holledge, Jonathan Bollen, Frode Helland, Joanne Tompkins
      Pages 71-110
  4. Adaptation

    1. Front Matter
      Pages 111-115
    2. Julie Holledge, Jonathan Bollen, Frode Helland, Joanne Tompkins
      Pages 117-156
    3. Julie Holledge, Jonathan Bollen, Frode Helland, Joanne Tompkins
      Pages 157-196
  5. Back Matter
    Pages 197-233

About this book

Introduction

'Anyone engaged in the critical evaluation of individual productions of A Doll House would do well to consult this groundbreaking presentation of an international baseline of performance interpretation, one based in a cumulative historical practice that up to this point has eluded scholarly analysis due to the inherent limitations of existing methods.' - Mark Sandberg, Professor of Film & Media and Scandinavian Studies, University of California, Berkeley, USA

'Digital humanities meet Ibsen, revealing astonishing patterns and amazing diversity. This first global history of one of the world’s most famous plays is a landmark contribution to Ibsen scholarship, performance history and cultural studies.' - Narve Fulsås, Professor of Modern History, University of Tromsø, Norway

'A very fine example of the new field of digital humanities, A Global Doll's House is a model exploration of the possibilities which new technologies offer, using them to provide precise and incisive answers to formerly unsolvable questions. It is, in fact, an important contribution to Ibsen Studies.' – Erika Fischer- Lichte, Professor of Theatre Studies, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

This book addresses a deceptively simple question: what accounts for the global success of A Doll’s House, Henrik Ibsen’s most popular play? Using maps, networks, and images to explore the world history of the play’s production, this question is considered from two angles: cultural transmission and adaptation. Analysing the play’s transmission reveals the social, economic, and political forces that have secured its place in the canon of world drama; a comparative study of the play’s 135-year production history across five continents offers new insights into theatrical adaptation. Key areas of research include the global tours of nineteenth-century actress-managers, Norway’s soft diplomacy in promoting gender equality, representations of the female performing body, and the sexual vectors of social change in theatre.

Keywords

Henrik Ibsen nineteenth century theatre Norwegian theatre A Doll’s House Et dukkehjem IbsenStage digital humanities international performances intercultural adaptation cultural transmission world drama production history Nora Helmer female performing body gender equality

Authors and affiliations

  • Julie Holledge
    • 1
  • Jonathan Bollen
    • 2
  • Frode Helland
    • 3
  • Joanne Tompkins
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Ibsen StudiesUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.School of the Arts and MediaUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Centre for Ibsen StudiesUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  4. 4.Humanities and Social SciencesUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia

Bibliographic information