Observing and Measuring Visual Double Stars

  • Editors
  • Bob Argyle

Part of the Patrick Moore’s Practical Astronomy Series book series (PATRICKMOORE)

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Bob Argyle
    Pages 1-15
  3. Bob Argyle
    Pages 17-24
  4. Mike Ropelewski
    Pages 25-34
  5. Bob Argyle
    Pages 35-38
  6. Bob Argyle
    Pages 39-45
  7. Bob Argyle
    Pages 47-52
  8. Andreas Alzner
    Pages 63-72
  9. Bob Argyle
    Pages 73-84
  10. Bob Argyle
    Pages 85-96
  11. Christopher Taylor
    Pages 97-136
  12. Tom Teague
    Pages 137-158
  13. Andreas Alzner
    Pages 159-167
  14. Andreas Maurer
    Pages 169-181
  15. Bob Argyle
    Pages 183-197
  16. Doug West
    Pages 199-208
  17. Nils Turner
    Pages 209-229
  18. Graham Appleby
    Pages 231-240
  19. Bob Argyle
    Pages 241-248

About this book

Introduction

Double stars are the rule, rather than the exception: our solar system, having a single sun, is in the minority. Orbiting satellites, ground-based observatories and interferometers have all helped discover many hundreds of new pairs - but this has left enormous numbers of wide, faint pairs under-observed or not observed at all. This is where amateur astronomers can help. Bob Argyle, a professional astronomer at Cambridge University, shows where enthusiastic amateur observers can best direct their efforts. The book caters for the use of every level of equipment, from simple commercial telescopes to micrometers and CCD cameras. Amateur astronomers who have gone beyond "sight-seeing” and want to make a genuine scientific contribution will find this a fascinating and rewarding field - and this book provides all the background and practical information that’s needed.

Keywords

CCD Observatories astronomy binary stars observational

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/b97664
  • Copyright Information Springer-Verlag London Limited 2004
  • Publisher Name Springer, London
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-1-85233-558-8
  • Online ISBN 978-1-85233-860-2
  • Series Print ISSN 1431-9756
  • About this book