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  • © 2022

Reorienting Hong Kong’s Resistance

Leftism, Decoloniality, and Internationalism

Palgrave Macmillan

Editors:

(view affiliations)
  • Offers a unique vision of Hong Kong's future

  • Allows outsiders a unique perspective into the radical politics of Hong Kong's protest year

  • Brings together the issues, from environmentalism to housing to rule of law, that unite Hong Kong's new activists

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  • ISBN: 978-981-16-4659-1
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Table of contents (18 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-xli
  2. Grounding the Movement

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 1-1
    2. Self-Determination Through Struggle

      • Promise Li
      Pages 15-28
    3. How to Abolish the Hong Kong Police

      • Vincent Wong, Edward Hon-Sing Wong
      Pages 29-45
    4. The Dilemma of the New Union Movement

      • Fung Chi Keung Charles, Lee Chun Wing
      Pages 47-60
  3. Internationalism from Below

    1. Front Matter

      Pages 191-191

About this book

“This groundbreaking book gives shape to what the authors call the ‘decolonial left,’ which defines itself against the New Cold War rivalries, legacies of British colonialism, and Chinese authoritarianism, to articulate practices of protesting and living in the space of global abolitionism and internationalism from below.”

Shu-mei Shih, Edward W. Said Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

“This breakthrough collection of essays is provocative, sincere, and makes not only a timely contribution to Hong Kong Studies but also thoughtful challenges to all who are concerned about Hong Kong.”

Law Wing Sang, Independent Researcher in Exile

This collection brings together writing from activists and scholars that examine leftist and decolonial forms of resistance that have emerged from Hong Kong’s contemporary protests. Practices such as labor unionism, police abolition, land justice struggles, and other radical expressions of self-governance may not always operate under the banners of leftism and decoloniality; yet, examining them within these frameworks uncovers historical and prefigurative sightlines that reveal their significance to Hong Kong’s future, and interlaces the city’s struggles with others around the world.

Wen Liu is assistant research fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, in Taiwan.  Her writing has published in journals such as American Quarterly, Feminism & Psychology, Journal of Asian American Studies, and Subjectivity.

JN Chien is a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. His writing has appeared in Hong Kong Studies, The Nation, Jacobin, and Lausan.

Christina Chung is a Ph.D. candidate researching the intersections of decolonial feminism and Hong Kong contemporary art at the University of Washington. Her writing has been published by Asia Art Archive, College Arts Association Reviews, and in Creating Across Cultures: Women in the Arts from China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan (East Slope Publishing, 2017).

Ellie Tse is a Ph.D. student in Cultural and Comparative Studies at the Department of Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Keywords

  • Decolonization
  • Social Movement
  • Anti-capitalism
  • Geopolitics
  • Ethnicity
  • Sinophone Studies

Reviews

“A rare and revealing anthology of leftist, decolonial and internationalist ideas rooted in the Hong Kong experience. These thought-provoking, praxis-based critical voices intimate political possibilities that are particularly necessary in these very dark times.” (Ching Kwan Lee, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles)

“This groundbreaking book gives shape to a new form of politics that the authors call the ‘decolonial left.’ The decolonial left defines itself against the New Cold War rivalries, legacies of British colonialism, Chinese authoritarianism, and all forms of class, race, and gender oppression, to articulate a politics of protesting and living in the space of global abolitionism and internationalism from below.  Hong Kong therefore becomes a paradigmatic space for theorizing a universal politics of the decolonial left while showcasing how it is done in practice. I recommend this book to anyone interested in radical politics and social movements beyond the binarisms that have hindered decolonization everywhere.” (Shu-mei Shih, Edward W. Said Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, Los Angeles)

“Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is abhorred and adored in unexpected ways: While Western leftists denounce it as a CIA-instigated revolt against a supposedly Communist fatherland, libertarians idolize it as the defense of a free-market paragon. This volume dispels such mythologizing by offering a fresh look through progressive internationalism. As the city’s struggle has entered a new phase under draconian repression, commentaries and critiques from leftist perspectives provide the needed intellectual resources for future engagement.” (Ho Ming-sho, Professor of Sociology, National Taiwan University)

“It is always difficult to explain what progressive politics are in Hong Kong. This collection of essays makes an innovative breakthrough in bringing together engaging analyses of the city from broadly defined ‘leftist’, de-colonial and internationalist perspectives. Their viewpoints are provocative, sincere and make not only a timely contribution to Hong Kong Studies but also thoughtful challenges to all those who are concerned about Hong Kong.” (Dr. Law Wing Sang, Independent Researcher in Exile)

“Considering the fact that many Hongkongers indulge in the fantasy of an ‘endgame,’ it is timely now to regain the courage and critical vision for democratic struggle. As the city turns a new page in its resistance to authoritarianism, reinterpreting local experiences from diverse leftist perspectives is a new mission for Hong Kong’s progressive movement—proof that it’s too early to say game over. This book will definitely inspire a generation of new radical intellectuals.” (Ip Iam-chong, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies of Cultural and Religious Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong)

“Grounded in the exigent particulars of Hong Kong’s history at the convergence of empires yet fiercely committed to the possibility of other futures, this collection makes vital contributions to leftist traditions of anticolonial and decolonial thought. The essays here think with people’s everyday practices under conditions of political, economic, and viral duress in rigorously hopeful ways. Modeling the trans-scalar, cross-border work required for this moment, Reorienting Hong Kong’s Resistance is welcome fuel for the struggle.” (Nadine Attewell, Associate Professor of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies & Global Asia, Simon Fraser University)

Editors and Affiliations

  • Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

    Wen Liu

  • Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

    JN Chien

  • Department of Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, University of Washington, Seattle, USA

    Christina Chung

  • Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

    Ellie Tse

About the editors

Wen Liu is assistant research fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, in Taiwan. She received her Ph.D. from Critical Social Psychology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Broadly interested in issues of race, sexuality, and affect, she has published in journals such as American Quarterly, Feminism & Psychology, Journal of Asian American Studies, and Subjectivity.

JN Chien is a Ph.D. candidate in American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California researching US-Hong Kong integration in the Cold War transpacific through economic history, labor, migration, and detention in the shadow of multiple imperialisms. His writing has been published in Hong Kong Studies, The Nation, Jacobin, and Lausan.

Christina Chung is a Ph.D. candidate researching the intersections of decolonial feminism and Hong Kong contemporary art at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her writing has been published by Asia Art Archive, College Arts Association Reviews, and in the anthology: Creating Across Cultures: Women in the Arts from China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan (East Slope Publishing, 2017).

Ellie Tse is a Ph.D. student in Cultural and Comparative Studies at the Department of Asian Languages & Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research addresses the aftermath of inter-imperial encounters via visual, spatial and architectural practices across the Sinophone Pacific with a focus on Hong Kong.

Bibliographic Information

Buying options

eBook
USD 89.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-981-16-4659-1
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD 119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)