Legal Aspects of Alien Acquisition of Real Property

  • Dennis Campbell

Table of contents

  1. Front Matter
    Pages i-xii
  2. Dennis Campbell, David S. Tenzer
    Pages 1-20
  3. Eugen Salpius
    Pages 21-37
  4. Stephane Bertouille
    Pages 39-50
  5. J. Korsø Jensen
    Pages 51-62
  6. Anthony E. Alexander
    Pages 63-76
  7. Peter Von Borch
    Pages 77-89
  8. Pierre Fontaneau
    Pages 91-96
  9. Joshua Weisman
    Pages 97-101
  10. A. P. Van Lidth De Jeude
    Pages 103-110
  11. Carlos Loring
    Pages 111-125
  12. Göran Ohlson
    Pages 127-134
  13. Karl Arnold, Max Walter
    Pages 135-151
  14. Robert Salkin
    Pages 153-193
  15. W. H. Balekjian
    Pages 195-204
  16. Back Matter
    Pages 205-206

About this book

Introduction

The concept of the nation-state has as an essential element the control of territory, legal and political authority over the acquisition, ownership, use and disposition of land. The rapid increase during the 1970s in the pace of foreign 1 investment -with the acquisition of real property as a centerpiece-has stirred new concern for the ability and disability of aliens to invest in and acquire title 2 to the physical territory of a given state. With a variety of factors now stimulating 3 foreign investment in land, increased attention has been given in many countries to the role of the state in controlling, inhibiting or prohibiting investment in real property by aliens. English law long ago established that the alien would be subject to significant 4 disabilities in connection with the ownership of land. The imposition of similar 5 restrictions on aliens is found in the early law of most nation-states. Such disabilities have their roots in the feudal period, and it was not until the eighteenth century that the countries of Continental Europe abandoned the absolute 6 prohibition on succession to real property by aliens. The prohibition was replaced by a tax imposed on aliens who withdrew the property of the state of which the decedent was a citizen. Common Law rules restricting alien succession developed in the thirteenth century.

Keywords

English Europe Germany controlling law tax on wages

Editors and affiliations

  • Dennis Campbell
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for International Legal StudiesSalzburgAustria
  2. 2.McGeorge School of LawUniversity of the PacificUSA

Bibliographic information

  • DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-4421-8
  • Copyright Information Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 1980
  • Publisher Name Springer, Dordrecht
  • eBook Packages Springer Book Archive
  • Print ISBN 978-94-017-4423-2
  • Online ISBN 978-94-017-4421-8
  • About this book